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A 1.2 percent ABV was discovered by a Hiker in a Hawaii stream that smelled like beer.

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After a local hiker discovered a beer-smelling stream in Waipio, Hawaii, local activists discovered that a nearby drain pipe was leaking alcohol – from a beer distributor across the street.


In October, a hiker in Hawaii discovered more than he bargained for when travelling through Waipio on the island of Oahu when he smelled the strong odour of beer emanating from a little creek. Officials have now found that the stream contains 1.2 per cent alcohol by volume.


The hiker immediately contacted Carroll Cox, an environmental activist and founder of the non-profit EnviroWatch. Cox has been an approachable watchdog for decades, and he has previously discovered streams tainted with paint and cement. But it wasn't clear why this stream smelled like beer until Cox looked across the street.


The stream, which ran about 120 feet beneath the H-2 expressway about 15 miles northwest of Honolulu, was within striking distance of local booze wholesaler Paradise Beverages. Cox discovered that the noxious liquid was pouring from a storm drain jutting out from beneath the motorway, down a cliff, and into a natural stream.


"He characterized the scent as awful," Cox added. "When we got here the other day, you'd assume it was a beer tavern that hadn't opened its doors in three or four days."


While the idea of an alcoholic stream may look amusing, this type of pollution creates unfriendly settings for aquatic life. Because the stream feeds into Pearl Harbor, Cox believes it might upset the delicate balance of life in Honolulu's famous port.


"We discovered a completely defective stormwater drain... that dumps down the canyon cliff," Cox explained. "This is just another day in paradise for me." Another dreadful, dreadful day in paradise."


On Oct. 27, the hiker phoned Cox and stated that he had previously attempted to warn environmental groups to the matter five years ago. For years, people have noticed that the stream alternates between smelling strongly of fruit punch and smelling strongly of beer. And an examination of the stream's water content by HawaiiNewsNow investigators explains why.


In addition to the 1.2 per cent alcohol content, HawaiiNewsNow discovered that the water contains.04 per cent sugar, which gives the stream its distinct odour. On November 8, EnviroWatch reported its findings to government officials, who identified the pollutant source as Paradise Beverages, the state's largest alcoholic beverage provider.


"Right now, we've had representatives from the Department of Transportation come in and we're dealing with them, and we've also been contacted by the Department of Health," Anthony Rowe, director of operations for Paradise Beverages, said. "It might be coming from us, which is why we're collaborating with the appropriate authorities."


While Cox is not startled by the pollution of freshwater streams, he is also not used to it. He described the problem as "commonplace" in Hawaii, where it was wreaking havoc on an already vulnerable ecology and endangering the state's only remaining wetlands.


Cox went on to say that rising sea levels are a result of global warming, contaminating Hawaii's freshwater sources with saltwater from the Pacific Ocean. The state's food and water accessibility will surely suffer as the state's freshwater sources dwindle while increasing storms cause coastal erosion.


"[There is] a lack of regard for the land and the water, despite what we preach," Cox added. "We don't do what we preach."


Cox's complaint to Hawaii's Department of Health's Clean Water Branch earlier this month stated that this type of contamination violated the Clean Water Act. He stated that the "alcohol concentration is not suited for marine life" and that it is not only "detrimental to the fish" but also "toxic."


"Hawaii is a vulnerable environment, and it is always at risk as a result of these kinds of dumpings," Cox said. "What we want to see in this instance is that the Hawaii State Clean Water Branch takes legal action against the DOT, and then the DOT is obligated to take action against the person accountable for the discharge."


The Transportation Department stated that it would continue to collaborate with the state's Health Department, as well as the city and county of Honolulu, to evaluate whether more action is required. They confirmed that they were unaware of the problem until Cox informed them of it.


"It's upsetting," Cox remarked. "It makes you want to tear out your hair, and I don't have much of it left."After a local hiker discovered a beer-smelling stream in Waipio, Hawaii, local activists discovered that a nearby drain pipe was leaking alcohol – from a beer distributor across the street.


In October, a hiker in Hawaii discovered more than he bargained for when travelling through Waipio on the island of Oahu when he smelled the strong odor of beer emanating from a little creek. Officials have now found that the stream contains 1.2 per cent alcohol by volume.


The hiker immediately contacted Carroll Cox, an environmental activist and founder of the non-profit EnviroWatch. Cox has been an approachable watchdog for decades, and he has previously discovered streams tainted with paint and cement. But it wasn't clear why this stream smelled like beer until Cox looked across the street.


The stream, which ran about 120 feet beneath the H-2 expressway about 15 miles northwest of Honolulu, was within striking distance of local booze wholesaler Paradise Beverages. Cox discovered that the noxious liquid was pouring from a storm drain jutting out from beneath the motorway, down a cliff, and into a natural stream.


"He characterized the scent as awful," Cox added. "When we got here the other day, you'd assume it was a beer tavern that hadn't opened its doors in three or four days."


While the idea of an alcoholic stream may look amusing, this type of pollution creates unfriendly settings for aquatic life. Because the stream feeds into Pearl Harbor, Cox believes it might upset the delicate balance of life in Honolulu's famous port.


"We discovered a completely defective stormwater drain... that dumps down the canyon cliff," Cox explained. "This is just another day in paradise for me." Another dreadful, dreadful day in paradise."


On Oct. 27, the hiker phoned Cox and stated that he had previously attempted to warn environmental groups to the matter five years ago. For years, people have noticed that the stream alternates between smelling strongly of fruit punch and smelling strongly of beer. And an examination of the stream's water content by HawaiiNewsNow investigators explains why.


In addition to the 1.2 per cent alcohol content, HawaiiNewsNow discovered that the water contains.04 per cent sugar, which gives the stream its distinct odour. On November 8, EnviroWatch reported its findings to government officials, who identified the pollutant source as Paradise Beverages, the state's largest alcoholic beverage provider.


"Right now, we've had representatives from the Department of Transportation come in and we're dealing with them, and we've also been contacted by the Department of Health," Anthony Rowe, director of operations for Paradise Beverages, said. "It might be coming from us, which is why we're collaborating with the appropriate authorities."


While Cox is not startled by the pollution of freshwater streams, he is also not used to it. He described the problem as "commonplace" in Hawaii, where it was wreaking havoc on an already vulnerable ecology and endangering the state's only remaining wetlands.


Cox went on to say that rising sea levels are a result of global warming, contaminating Hawaii's freshwater sources with saltwater from the Pacific Ocean. The state's food and water accessibility will surely suffer as the state's freshwater sources dwindle while increasing storms cause coastal erosion.


"[There is] a lack of regard for the land and the water, despite what we preach," Cox added. "We don't do what we preach."


Cox's complaint to Hawaii's Department of Health's Clean Water Branch earlier this month stated that this type of contamination violated the Clean Water Act. He stated that the "alcohol concentration is not suited for marine life" and that it is not only "detrimental to the fish" but also "toxic."


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"Hawaii is a vulnerable environment, and it is always at risk as a result of these kinds of dumpings," Cox said. "What we want to see in this instance is that the Hawaii State Clean Water Branch takes legal action against the DOT, and then the DOT is obligated to take action against the person accountable for the discharge."


The Transportation Department stated that it would continue to collaborate with the state's Health Department, as well as the city and county of Honolulu, to evaluate whether more action is required. They confirmed that they were unaware of the problem until Cox informed them of it.


"It's upsetting," Cox remarked. "It makes you want to tear out your hair, and I don't have much of it left."

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